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schools of thought on how to deal with israel. mark perry is a foreign policy analyst who remains close contact with the hamas leadership. >> abu mazen has gambled very explicitly and said very explicitly that there will be no violence against israel and he will negotiate in good faith with israel. the problem is that hasn't gotten him anywhere. hamas has a totally different approach and their approach is resistant. they believe israel will only come to the table when they feel pain. >> warner: a bring number of palestinians see justification for that belief. last november a week of palestinian rocket fire from gaza and israeli air strikes led to an egyptian-brokered cease-fire between hamas and israel. as part of that, some israeli restrictions on gaza were eased. the year before, hamas secured the release of a thousand prisoners from israeli jails in return for handing over gilad shalit, the israeli soldier it kidnapped in 2006. >> it has sent a clear message to the palestinian people if you abduct soldiers the they will be released but if you sign agreements about w us about releasin
that was open to conservative views, particularly on foreign policy and some domestic issues. it was much more electric than at this time is now. now it is another liberal magazine. >> i want to show you an ad that was in the publication in 2007. well let's see if you remember this ad. on the screen, all aboard, enjoy seven days and night on the aalso can coast with your favorite weekly standard pundits, june 16-23, 200. special private programs and receptions. on and on. like-mind conservatives. what was the impact of that cruise on american politics? >> sure. well i think the discovery of sarah palin was one thing. on the cruise, we went up there in southern -- we were not up around anchorage in that part of alaska, but we were mr. we went to juno and so on. in juno, we were invited by the governor to have lunch at her house in the governor's mansion. he found out later this came about because the woman who was the head of the alaska federation of republican women or whatever the title is and had told the governor's space that we were coming and, at first, she was ignored. she told them agai
. >> dick cheney was a trained foreign policy expert. so was colin powell. >> indeed, the facts and iraq's behavior show that saddam hussein and his regime are concealing their efforts to produce more weapons of mass destruction. >> the national debate over going to war in iraq was heavily lopsided in favor of war. in the united states senate, the war resolution passed with 77 votes, only 23 senators opposed it, including only one republican rhode island senator rink on chafee. >> what concerns me most is the pattern we see applied to iraq, that is abandoning of our alliances and willing to be preemptive without any real evidence of weapons of mass destruction. >> in the house of representatives the war resolution passed with 296 votes. 133 house members voted against it, including a congresswoman from san francisco who was working her way up the leadership ladder. >> let's do what is proportionate, appropriate, which mitigates risk for our young people, another cost in addition to human lives, cost to terrorism and cost to the economy and another cost to our budget. this cost can be unl
to offer as president on foreign policy. one of the things i have to say that richard nixon is he believed in the big play, or you call it a hail mary pass. he was willing to take huge risks. not all presidents are will do that. detente with th the soviet union with 20. so get a lot to offer presidents. but i do believe, i know this for a fact, there was an effort to make it difficult was it takes to become available. richard nixon, richard nixon by the way was totally in his right to assume that the tapes belonged to him. because every president until richard nixon owned their papers. the national archives didn't know that there were kennedy tapes until, until the nixon tape were released and the kennedy family dental the nation archives, you know that safe in the warehouse which we only have teased? there are tapes there. the national archives didn't know. and so president kennedy, president johnson and president nixon assumed that the tapes they were making would belong to them. well, when president nixon cut a deal, with the overseer of the national archives to try to get back to tapes
and deficit thing. another is that i think the republican party has to make clear what its foreign policy is. it has had two wars for the past 12 years, people are still settling in and thinking, the voters have said, we don't like that. we're not for that. the republican party has to make clear what it stands for and it is going to have a little bit of debate to get there. those two big things and the policies that spring from them will make all of the difference, so will an eventual compelling presidential candidate. somebody who is involved right now. at the end of the day, it's the candidates who resolve a lot of unresolved things by taking a stand and speaking forcefully for it. >> that was bill clinton after walter mondale lost it. after jimmy carter lost. we had a dynamic governor who was reformed minded and brought those issues into the national forefront. he really helped recharge the democratic party. you know, the republican party is out to lunch. i watched cpac, karl. karl was a former friend. >> i thought i was a current friend? >> you're always a friend, you owe me some chili.
years. the president spoke out on that amidst all the other busy stuff he was doing on foreign policy this week. and he said even after nearly two and a half years, a minority of senators continued to block a simple up or down vote on her nomination. the d.c. circuit has more vacancies than any other appeals court. yet we know this doesn't get a lot of attention. do you think there is any. >> to put more pressure on this do nothing congress? >> it is unlikely she will come back up. what is happening here is that this is part of the conservative cause on judicial nominations. they're made about what happened during the bush years when democrats blocked a landful of very conservative judicial nominees. in some respects, this might be payback. what could obama do? he can try another couple of judicial nominations. the bottom line is he needs to clear these judicial nominations with at least a handful of republicans. otherwise if they're too liberal, they will get filibustered. >> thank you very much. >> thank you. >>> up next, a huge week ahead for gay rights as the supremes take up two
that chemical agents have been used. senator lindsey graham spoke about the allegations telling foreign policy that quote this. we need to come up with a plan to secure these weapons sites either in conjunction with our partners or, if nothing else, by ourselves. if the choice is to send in troops to secure the weapons sites versus allowing chemical weapons to get in the hands of some of the most violent people in the world, i vote to cut this off before it becomes a problem. but following intelligence briefings, the chairs of both the house and senate intelligence committee said they believe president bashar al assad has crossed the so-called red line in the civil war. >> i think the days are becoming mow desperate. the regime is more desperate. we know where the chemical weapons are. there's no secret that they are there. i think the probabilities are very high that we are going into some very dark times and i think the white house needs to be prepared. >> i have a high probability to believe that chemical weapons were used. we need that final verification but given everything we know over t
spotlight on magazine series. he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and host: good morning, and welcome to the washington journal. the federal reserve chairman holds his news conference with .eporters u.s. aid officials testify on syria. the commerce panel hears from ,he faa about sequestration and a hearing on domestic use of drones. all those events and more on c- span.org. 10 years ago today marks the us- led invasion into iraq. that is where we begin this morning to get your take on the 10th anniversary. here are the numbers -- host: send us a tweet or post your comments on facebook. we will get to your phone calls in just a minute. is the us from baghdad pentagon correspondent for the washington post. begin with your headline this morning. at least 60 are killed in iraq on tuesday. what happened, and is this a pattern? guest: it has been the deadliest day since u.s. troops have pulled out. an al qaeda group took responsibility for this wave of bombings, and said it was doing so to seek revenge from the government. hearing si
started the center back in 1983, it was our first dedicated foreign policy center at the heritage foundation. back then asian security was all about what's happening here in the cold war. from that perspective, study of the soviet union might have made a lot more sense. dick and i, as we talked it through, talked about the potential that someday it might even be conceivable that u.s. trade with asia would actually even equal our trade with what was going on across the atlantic. today, it's much greater than our trade across the atlantic. we have been blessed by the insights of many dear friends in asia. we have over the years seen the remarkable economic growth and economic development in asia. it's been our very great pleasure, in fact, to recognize that in terms of economic freedom, as it has evolved throughout asia in specific countries and indeed throughout the region. we always knew that our good friends in japan and that the u.s.japan mutual relationship, both the mutual defense treaty and our bilateral general relationship would be central. but we also thought that asia des
'hanlon director of research and a senior of foreign policy fellow at the brookings institution. >> thank you. >> that sound that we played for the president's speech today, is what we heard a fair response to the criticism that the president hasn't acted aggressively enough? >> well it's a very fair way of looking at the theory. in theory any military operation sound appealing when you're frustrated by what you're watching and you want to make a difference. the president is certainly right to remember that when you get involved, you know, it's hard to get out and even if you start providing arms to the rebels, you implicate yourself in a way that it mayes in estate escalation. i agree that we should be arming the rebels and i consider nato arab league and combined air strikes in support of it, but i understand the president's reluctance so far. i think it's about time, though, we re-assess. you've written extensively on military options for syria. is it your view that the united states should enact an air operation? because one of assad's greatest advantages over the rebels, as you know, is
next, house foreign affairs committee chairman ed royce talks about u.s. policy towards the asia-pacific region including u.s. relations with china and north korea's nuclear program. then former national security adviser brzezinski discusses the situation in iraq at a forum marking the tenth anniversary of the war. and later, former state and treasury department officials discuss the orange of the islamic militant -- origin of the islamic militant group hezbollah and its global terrorist threat. >> also today retired general john allen who commanded forces in afghanistan discusses the progress of the war during his command and the future mission of the u.s. and nato in the country. general allen led the forces in afghanistan for 19 months from mid 2011 through february of this year. he'll be hosted by the brookings institution, and you can see his remarks live later in this morning at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> tonight on "first ladies," called a bigamist and adulterer during her husband's 1828 presidential campaign, rachel jackson chis of an -- dies of an apparent heart attac
. everybody is interested obviously in the foreign policy side like the end of the war in vietnam. but i noticed this in the second term of the bush administration there was more interest in the domestic policy. it is a real problem for historians because of the tapes richard nixon is not always very happy about his domestic policy. i was wondering since we are looking at the earlier period for next-gen, where would you put him in the new deal in the 1950's? would you say he is interested in a continuation of the new deal? what role does he see the government playing in the society? >> certainly think he had no desire to undo the new deal. she was very much aware and in favor of a catastrophic health plan. don't forget when nixon was growing up his family was poor, but he had two brothers who died of tuberculosis so there wasn't very good health care. one brother was 7-years-old, six or seven and then his older brother died when he was 25 and so she was -- so he was very much an internationalist and nixon was a big supporter of the marshall plan and voted for it and a lot of his sestak e
on that journey with. that is trying to figure out what our foreign policy is. i have had a very hard time doing that. i am stumped on the answer in syria. i do not know what the answer is. we have waited so long to really do anything. it reminds me of iran in 2009 and we saw an opportunity against the regime. i find ourselves in a situation now where i do feel like we are reacting to this situation and if we go back to the beginning of the conflict and the net -- and the initial uprising of assad, you have the iran receive supporting the syrian regime on the one hand, and syrian fighter -- freedom fighters on the other hand. at that time, you could assume extremism would not have the ability to organize to this -- to the great extent they probably organize now. at the beginning, and i am asking yolks because you're at -- asking you because you were at these compositions, against a regime that is a supported obama -- supported by iran? i will keep it short because there is a lot i want to ask. >> to be very brief, congressman, i, personally, do not agree we waited so long. we were helping democr
their own energy. lou: we have not address the energy -- issue central to our foreign policy go about -- over last two decades, and it's about damn time our leaders started thinking about them. thank you both. we appreciate very much. thank you. much more on the president's day in israel and the tensions that are rising in the middle east. we will have much more throughout this broadcast. the president's gun-control agenda is on life support. we'll take a look at the real reason for its demise in tonight's "chalk talk". staying the course. fed chair ben bernanke says easing money is here to stay. ubs chief economist with us on the economy, the market, and the fed next. ♪ ♪ lou: ben bernanke's federal reserve keeping money cheap, plentiful. chief economist for ubs will tell us whether this is sufficient magic for the market through the remainder of the year. let's take a look at what happened on wall street. today's talks are moving higher. investors expecting just the news that they received, the fed's standing fast, holding steady, helping -- keeping 85 billion a month into the m
's good to get away from congress. >> we'll get insight on what comes next from our foreign policy experts, including abc news global affairs correspondent christiane amanpour and jeffrey goldberg. >>> hello again. you're going to see president obama touching down at andrews air force late last night after his first trip to israel as president. we'll analyze the mission and what comes next for that volatile region later in the program. >>> but, first, the debates that president obama is returning to here at home. and for that, a "this week" first, jim messina and karl rove join our powerhouse roundtable. welcome to both of you, along with donna brazile, peggy noonan and "nightline" anchor terry moran. karl, let me begin with you, 5:00 a.m., the senate passes a budget. the house has already passed a budget. very stark differences between the two, everyone waiting for president obama to weigh in on this. i guess my question to you is, despite those stark differences, do you see this as the beginning of negotiations toward a compromise? >> i frankly take this as a constructive sign. it gives
use and throw away the key. i think there are people who would like a less aggressive foreign policy. there are all kinds of issues that don't neatly fit in the left/right paradigm that i think would help because we are not the doing well in a lot of the purple and blue states so we do need a candidate that would appeal across the left/right paradigm. >> chris: we have about 30 seconds left. your budget which would balance the budget your plan would balance the budget in five years. paul ryan's which has come under attack for balancing it in ten years. you introduced it three consecutive years if and the most votes was this weekend when you got 18. isn't that out o of the mainstream? >> the thing is i think the legislature is ten years pee the public.behind i introduced a bill to quit sending money to egypt. 9 o percent of americans agree with me and 80% of the senators disagree with me. i would argue that the senate is not up-to-date on what the people really want chris thank you for joining us and always good to talk with you, sir. >> thank you. >> chris: up next, the supreme court
american foreign policy. >> thank you, nice to be with you. sandra: the air lift, all encompassing the parts of the middle east and turkey including assault rifles, machine guns, rocket propelled grenades, antitank weaponry. do you believe with what you know of the situation, that this will be a game change and actually remove assad? >> sandra, what's new is the report. this has been going on for months, if not a year, providing arms, and more recently, 160 flights of cargo, weapons, over 3500 tons. this just didn't happen last week. the issue is that a game changer, obviously, the, i think, very brave rebellion revolution happening in syria led by the free syria army has been fighting against insurmountable odds with regimes of the iranians and russians killed 3 million and thousands displaced, and over two years and counting with the simple weapons that they have, so, certainly, if we were not just leading from behind and having the cia do it covertly, but leading from in front and helping the right ones, because remember, sandra, this report shows we're allowing qatar, saudi sau
foreign policy guru who will bring us up to date on what the president is up to in the middle east and his syria in fact use chemical weapons as has been reported. and the republican party engaged in a sort of a civil war. we'll get into that, but first -- >> announcer: this is the "full court press." >> espn releasing president obama's complete march madness yesterday as the men's tournament gets underway today. number one louisville, indiana, ohio state, and then florida. and he believes that indiana will beat louisville on n the title game. on the women's side baylor connecticut, and california. his final pick for that will be revealed tomorrow. >> bill: i didn't do the women's bracket. >> i don't the women's bracket. i'm sorry. >> bill: we'll let you know our picks later this hour. >> michelle obama was at the [ inaudible ] to celebrate easter and brought bo with her. she handed out bo-shaped cookies, and handed out tickets to the easter egg roll at the white house. >> bill: that fisher house is a great, great program. really, really do good stuff. >> yeah.
to get some credibility back, that's important. >> and foreign policy is a fascinating place for republicans. we've talked about the policy. there's a lot of room to grow and change. >> and a lot of disagreement. >> thank you. >> and we will be right back. [ male announcer ] from the way the bristles move to the way they clean, once you try an oral-b deep sweep power brush, you'll never want to go back. its dynamic power bristles reach between teeth to remove up to 76% more plaque than sonic in hard to reach areas. oral-b deep sweep 5000 power brush. constipated? yeah. mm. some laxatives like dulcolax can cause cramps. but phillips' caplets don't. they have magnesium. for effective relief of occasional constipation. thanks. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. >>> remember to make sure and follow andrea's travels with secretary john kerry. you can follow her on twitter @mitchellreports. my colleague tamron hall has a look at what's next on "news nation." >>> on the next hour on the eve of the supreme court hearing, protests in california, head of the historic
away the key. so, i think there are people who would like a less aggressive foreign policy and there are all kinds of issues that don't neatly left in the left-right paradigm that i think would help, because we're not doing very well in a lot of these states, purple and blue states and we need a candidate that would appeal across the left-right paradigm. >> chris: briefly, 30 seconds left, though. your budget which would balance the budget, your plan, would balance the budget in five years, paul ryan's which has come under attack for balancing it in ten years, you have introduced it three consecutive years in the senate, the most votes you got was this weekend when you got 18 of 100 senators, isn't it out of the mainstream? >> well, the thing is, i think the legislature is about ten years behind the public. for example, i have introduced amendments to quit sending money to egypt and build bridges here in the the united states instead of in egypt. and i bet you 90% of the american people agree with me but 80% of my senators disagree. i argue the senate is not up-to-date with
secretary of state she has the ooutcome of his foreign policy record to date around her neck and consequences of that to deal with all kinds of things could happen. way too early to assure her a clear thing. >> bill: everyone has to acknowledge that her stint of secretary of state perception, not necessarily reality. but perception has been very successful because when two thirds think that she is okay now, that means they like what she did. and that includes some republicans because with it thirds much the country isn't democrat. i see her. i'm trying to look at the democratic field. you have guys like andrew cuomo, the governor of new york. o'malley the governor of maryland. they are going to run to her left. all right? they are going to try to knock her out from the left if i had to bleted right now i would bet she is a democratic nominee. >> that's what we all thought a few years ago. >> bill: there is no barack obama in the country unless an illegal alien is going to run. >> we didn't think there was a barack obama then. >> bill: we knew barack obama was sitting in the s
it all up, it's probably $2 trillion to $3 trillion of american costs, distorted american foreign policy. the idea that we took so much of our situation after the end of the cold war and we devoted it to iraq given everything else we could've, should've done. historians will scratch their head and say why did the united states get so distracted and distorted -- >> and stayed there after we knew there weren't weapons. >> and that's the big lesson we should draw from this in afghanistan. we've got to respect local realities. united states cannot go around the middle east and remake it in our liking. we've got to have a degree of humility about the limits of our influence. and you asked whether we learned the lessons. with vietnam, iraq and afghanistan, i hope we've learnlearn ed. >> and iraq and afghanistan. first of all, be far, far more skeptical than most of us were going in to iraq. also, no matter how far you are down the path, if it's the wrong path, turn around. and we should've done that. i want to read what you talked about the human cost. mike barnicle e-mailed me this last night
foreign policy. each case is treated as an isolated situation. look at this itinerary, what he has planned there is not much to improve the relationship with the israeli government in a content level. martha: president obama has said we are not sort of this super power that we used to be in many ways. the world has changed, right? so there is an opportunity here to be a leader, in terms of israel. to go to israel, doug and say look nothing has changed in this relationship we are steadfast in our support of israel, which of course he has said but some people feel the meaning behind it hasn't been as forceful as in the past. >> i agree with you, martha, if he goes and does that and i fully expect he will, that is an important state. standing with our only stable democratic ally in the middle east is hugely important given the unrest in egypt and throughout the region. i think that clarifying positions on iran, the red line and what we're prepared to do and where we've prepared to do it is critically important. i'm glad he's willing to do that even if it's limited to just that. martha: look a
. it was a name juror foreign policy objective of the obama administration when he came in. special envoy grossman who took mr. holbrooke's place when he passed away had a principle mission to do that but those negotiations broke down because one, the karzai government was not involved, pakistan was not involved and the various influential groups inside afghanistan were also not involved. the fact that karzai is beginning the initiative i don't see anything wrong with that. i think it's the beginning of a very long process which is also troubled by the opposition that the factions have and the strong views. i mean people in afghanistan do not want the taliban to take control of any of the population inside of afghanistan after a negotiated settlement to be sure. jenna: you mentioned the factions though. it was interesting doing a little research for this segment i realize the state department does not list the taliban as a terrorist organization. there are different taliban-related groups, for example, a taliban, i want to call it a sector, a taliban group in pakistan that is listed as a terrorist
dominated politics on three issues -- foreign policy, taxes, and social issues. among social issues, they won the battle and lost the war. there is no single social issue in your favor going forward. on taxes, you stand for giving breaks to the rich. they didreign policy, not support the bush foreign policy, so the stoll that made that republican party dominant come all three issues are in democratic favre. until you deal with these problems, it does not matter until network -- it does not matter what network you have. conservatives and, smaller government, less intrusion, and with they will have to figure out how to mollify the social movement. >> i do not think anyone has suggested the only thing that republicans are waiting right now is doing any better data bases and do we need more storefront offices. i was responding to a question directly about that. there is a lot of discussion going on right now about positioning, policies, looking for some of integrating new program pauses, how do we explain our policies better. i do not accept the premise that there is no doubt when you l
foundation and asian studies center. when we started it 1983, it was our first dedicated foreign policy center at the heritage foundation. back and asian security was all about what was happening here in the cold war. from that perspective, the study of the soviet union might have made more sense. to as we talked, we talked about the potential it could be conceivable u.s. trade with asia with equal trade across the atlantic. today it is much several times greater than that we have them blessed that over the years we have seen their remarkable economic growth and development. it is our pleasure to recognize that in terms of economic freedom as it has evolved throughout asia and pacific countries and indeed throughout the region. wheel is new our good and friends in japan and that a mutual relationship, the mutual defense treaty would be central. but we also thought asia deserved fully of broader treatment in its own right so we invested in the future. as we look ahead but those in the range of foreign and strategic and economic policy issues coming today it is hard to distinguish one fro
. when dick and i started the center back in 1983, it was our first dedicated foreign policy center at the heritage foundation. back then asian security was all about what's happening here in the cold war. from that perspective, study of the soviet union might have made a lot more sense. dick and i, as we talked it through, talked about the potential that someday it might even be conceivable that u.s. trade with asia would actually even equal our trade with what was going on across the atlantic. today, it's much greater than our trade across the atlantic. we have been blessed by the insights of many dear friends in asia. we have over the years seen the remarkable economic growth and economic development in asia. it's been our very great pleasure, in fact, to recognize that in terms of economic freedom, as it has evolved throughout asia in specific countries and indeed throughout the region. we always knew that our good friends in japan and that the u.s.-japan mutual relationship, both the mutual defense treaty and our bilateral general relationship would be central. but we also thou
nations, united states is coming up too much with foreign policy and helping the fallen in getting involved too much. -- getting involved with foreign nations too much. u.n. another call on the did you want to weigh in on that? way it ist is not the seen in the world, where people feel the united states is not engaged enough after recent years. host: nathan guttman is with jewish daily forward and said arikat with al-quds. question had a quick and i would like a clarification of it. that the two me state solution is dead. the situation is static. here is my question. understood that all of the palestinians in the west bay and in gaza, are they subject -- in the west bank and in gaza, are they subject to israel? do we have a situation where palestinians do not get rights? guttman? the minority of the palestinians in east jerusalem do have is really i.d. cards. arelegal terms is that they an occupied population. guest: absolutely. the occupation that has gone on for far too long has denied palestinians the most basic of rights. israelis can arrest people, as we have seen last night.
direction, that the appeal of a nonintervention in foreign- policy is really picking up's read. rand paul stop by national review and he is a charismatic figure. that matters in politics. we saw his speech here and elsewhere that this is a guy who resonates on the floor and i think he has a bright future in republican politics. >> did john mccain revised his remark? i did not know that. >> he apologized. >> good for him. he was jealous that someone could stand up for 12 hours without urinating. >> rand paul had help with other folks. i agree with the fact that we ought to be putting pressure on the justice department and the administration to come forward with a lot of clearances. what was your take on it? >> given the situation he's in, many conservatives -- his father could walk into a room and rand is the opposite. rand looks for ways to diffuse the situation. people who have served in politics understand how important that is. i had the privilege of going with rand paul and his wife and two of his sons to israel right outside of jordan in january. what i saw was amazing politician. a
is political advisor, he is not a foreign policy expert as least the last time i looked, and yet he is sending memos to the secretary of state on benghazi. let me say i don't think there is anything improper about that but certainly underlines the political nature of the administration's handling of the post-benghazi environment. and i can't wait to read these memos. i'm sure they will be a real treat. i think it will simply increase demands in congress for answers about the real facts of benghazi that after six months we still haven't gotten skbri mean, the thoughts on hacking, everybodies that -- everybody has their feeling how this should be handled the law doesn't crack down on people's ability to tap into private exchanges. one thing i think it truly highlights here, if there is a need in social media, even extending into the law breakers, to learn more about what happened, it does, does it not, say something about the energy in this country to produce some truth in this matter? >> yeah. i think there should be more protection for intellectual property on the internet, for people's own co
received praise from mitt romney's former chief foreign policy adviser on his commitment to containing the iranian nuclear program. take a listen. >> what he said in israel is, we will do everything we need to do and containment won't work. it's not a policy preference, it will not work. in a sense the president was taking on his own at home, saying containing an iran nuclear program is unworkable. and for him to say that in israel, on the ground, standing with the israeli prime minister was a powerful statement. so i think it had the effect of reassuring the prime minister. >>> and with the defense of marriage act and proposition 8 both going before the supreme court this week, it was a hot topic on many of the sunday morning shows. former adviser to president george w. bush, karl rove, was asked about gay rights and the future of the republican party on abc this morning. take a listen to what he said. >> can you imagine the next presidential campaign, a republican candidate saying, flat-out, i am for gay marriage? >> i could. >> the debate over gun control was reinvigorated today, by
's foreign policy cognizenti, can't seem to draw the obvious conclusions, stop letting these karzai guys play us as suckers and speed up our exit and stop wasting american lives and dollars. that is not very diplomatic but comes from the former head here and probably, as you probably know what a fair number of people think. is that the right prescription? in other words, he is going beyond something that you're talking about. >> it is pretty close except for some of the rhetoric because i don't think we're wasting lives and dollars there. i think we have had a mission. that mission was to remove of the taliban from control of afghanistan. and it was to try to provide the afghan security forces with the numbers and the capabilities, the skills, that they need to prevent the taliban from taking control again. that mission has, for the most part successful militarily. the part which will help to sustain it which is to have a government in afghanistan which is less corrupt, has not been as successful. but it's, nonetheless i think, going to leave afghanistan and we're not going to totally leave i
politics than with foreign-policy. but there is this session it will never happen, but it could happen. to protect israel in a credible fashion, if we wish, by guarantees which are as binding or or more binding than those we get to the europeans and those to the japanese and south koreans. and this is a country which does not have the opportunity to threaten us directly. at the same time, we should not lose sight that if we do repeat iran, what we did vis-À-vis iraq, we will probably engaged in a conflict that is more protracted and more regionally widespread than was the case with iraq a decade ago? so these are some of the concerns from history. let me make one more observation about the nature of war. toker sees are very able wage total war if they are attacked. they are not so good. they're not read this post. they are mentally not prepared to wage total war if they started they were themselves but were not attacked. difference.ortant we were able to break the will of the germans in large measure by massive air assaults on their civilian population. yes, of course, it was justifie
of these things in the world that richard travels in, the foreign policy hands writer establishment there was a great uproar when this came out and i think most people had never seen anything quite like it from a leader in the middle east. >> fair statement. >>> coming up on "morning joe," the rise of the retrowife. why a new group of modern feminists saying having it all really means staying at home? we will discuss this with campbell brown, cosmo's joanna coles and the bbckatty kay. . ♪ for tapping into a wealth of experience. for access to one of the top wealth management firms in the country. for a team of financial professionals who provide customized solutions. for all of your wealth management and retirement goals, discover how pnc wealth management can help you achieve. visit pnc.com/wealthsolutions to find out more. in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective slee
of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and tweets. "washington journal" every morning live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> said they hired a very expensive carriage. elizabeth monroe dressed herself in her best and went to the prison where she was being held. she met with madame lafayette and basically made her case public one. some stories say, the next day, she was released. it was not the next day. it was a couple of months. it's pretty much kept her from going to the guillotine. >> in some ways, she has her own cause. she works with the washington aquino orphan asylum. in some sense, that is somewhat more and -- modern. she does work politics in her parlor. >> our conversation with historians on elizabeth monroe catherine adams. it is now available on our web site. >> other generations are asking, how do we adapt? how do we move in this fast- paced world? millennial are taking it in stride because that is the reality of how we grew up. it has brought a sense of ease and adaptability. it has brought us the ability to be resilient to the economic cr
's foreign policy, but that few americans talk about anymore. according to a study, americans will continue to spend billions of dollars a year to care for iraq veterans. savannah? >> richard engel thank you very much. >>> coming up more from the vatican where pope francis shook hands with vice president joe biden. matt is there with maria shriver. first this is "today" on nbc. [ female announcer ] made just a little sweeter... because all these whole grains aren't healthy unless you actually eat them ♪ multigrain cheerios. also available in delicious peanut butter. healthy never tasted so sweet. ♪ the one and only, cheerios vonn go public with themselves where on facebook, after your local news. bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xa
teachers their reporting responsibility and require the administrator to review the policy and allow districts to immediately remove teachers suspected of child abuse and dismiss them at any point. >> veterans of foreign wars, another marine has died in nevada desert over the explosion. mourners held a vigil last night near the park with hundreds turning out to on the fallen marines killed in a training accident. six remain in the hospital. the marines are from camp lejeune, north carolina, training for a night warfare. >> every loss of life is heartbreaking whether that occurs in afghanistan, nevada, camp lejeune, north carolina, or anywhere else. >> the marine corps has suspended use of all 16 millimeter mortars until the investigation is complete. the defense department has yet to release the names of the dead. they are all under the age of 30. >> new information on monday night's fatal shooting of a car theft suspect by san jose police. the officer who fired the fatal shot also wounded a murder suspect during a shootout in november. the officer, a five-year veteran, sho
. >> we all no asia is on the rise. he served as singapore's foreign secretary and the dean of the country's school of public policy. he has a new book out "the great convergence, asia, the west and the logic of one world." welcome back. you start the book with good news. since everybody in the united states and the west has been feeling blue, tell us what the good news is with and why we should be happy. >> actually i'm surprised by the kind of level of posseessimism europe and america. the world has never been in better shape if you look at the view. the number was dying in dying in conflicts is the lowest it has ever been. in term of global poverty the only u.n. goal is having more than having by 2015. and the middle class, and this is a really stunning news, if you look at where asia is today, they are 500 million people living in middle-class living standards today in 2013 in asia. by 2020, which is seven years in now, the number will explode from 500 million to 1.75 billion. an increase of 3.5 times in seven years. we've never seen this before in human history. that's going to change
levin. he'll be speaking at the council on foreign relations on u.s. defense policy issues. life coverage begins at 12:30 eastern again here on c-span2. and the u.s. house and senate return today to consider continuing funding for the federal government past march 27th when current funding expires. they're also expected to work on their respective budget plans for fiscal year 204. the house back at 2 p.m. for legislative business. floor debate likely while members wait for the senate to ask. also the senate in at 3 p.m. --2 p.m. eastern. and then hoping to move on to the 2014 budget resolution, and they hope to get it approved before by the end of the week before the easter recess. life coverage of the house, as usual, on c-span and, of course, the senate right here on c-span2. ..2 last week endorsed a review of military roles to allow seniors to manage overturns sexual assault victims. testified before the senate armed services subcommittee on personnel. >> i am incredibly grateful that many of you came this morning and listened to the first two panels. that means a great deal,
netanyahu netanyahu. i always find it we're when they give foreign leaders nick names. it seems overly friendly beyond the level of policy and i don't mind it in your own personal life, but when you are in public call each other by your real names, please. >> kind of like blare bear never caught on. >> hal: exactly. that's peculiar to me. you wouldn't go vlad and i -- when you are talking to vladimir putin. so -- >> and it's not a very masculine nickname, either. >> hal: no bee bee is like a tiny little sphere. bb is substitute word when you can't pronounce things. >> obama: it's nice to get away from congress. >> hal: just when they are yelling to start the music, and you hear president obama lean over, it's good to get away from congress. you know how bad things are in your relationship with congress that you go to israel to talk about peace -- i think it was gilbert gilbert gottfried who said there was this genie and he says i'll grant you unwish. the palestinians and the jews have been fighting forever, would you please do something about it. and he said i can't
understand each other. let me move quickly to a national a foreign house will. he believes such a firm should exist, that we should have a fund to help us maintain our affordable housing stock. >> congressman, beverly is outside the bill of my responsibility. that's not policy decision for the congress. i didn't come here to have an opinion about the trust fund. >> i'll accept your answer. >> thank you. >> the gentleman's time has expired and we appreciate the comments. and with that we turn now to the gentleman from virginia. >> thank you. thank you for your candor and your lead. after many long years the gst these are beginning to turn a profit. i guess i would like to hear from you the advantages and disadvantages of the return to profitability for you as concerned what should we -- has it led to any change in tactics to accomplish this reform and your part? there are things that perhaps who would be wise to look out for with this positive turn of events but also recognizing that we really do need fundamental reform and the taxpayers have ponied up north of $180 billion. >> it's hard to se
about it, foreign aid -- we never talk about it, foreign aid, our foreign policy hasn't been reauthorized for years. there hasn't been a full-time inspector general in the state department in six years. we have seven open spots for inspector generals to actually look at this stuff and to advise us and advise the agencies. so we're failing to do our job. and my only wish of my colleagues is to get informed, and if you're on a committee, you don't have to solve it the way i'd solve it, but just solve it. it makes no sense to continue to duplicate things. as a matter of fact, in job training, here's what g.a.o. said. of the 47 job training programs for nondisabled people -- we have another 53 for the disabled. of the 47, all but three do exactly the same thing. all right? so either g.a.o. is lying or they're not. if they're not lying, why wouldn't we in the next two months in this place fix those programs, to make them where they're actually giving real skills that will give a real livelihood to people who need real job training? no effort at all to do that. the house just passe
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